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Best Places to Find Native American Arrowheads.


Category: Geography

Where would be the best place to find native american arrowheads. Where would you stay? Are there are legal issues associated with hunting for arrowheads?

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+ 27 -
A friend used to find many arrowheads and peace pipes along the Kentucky side of the Ohio River.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
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+ 21 -
Georgia
Submitted by:
sneh
5 years ago
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+ 15 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads, however, you cannot take them from public lands. You can ask for permission to search on private lands. Arroyos, vacant lots, and rock quarries can be great hunting grounds.
Submitted by:
Angela F.
5 years ago
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+ 6 -
Finding arrowheads or other Native American artifacts is not an easy task. If you want to be a successful artifact hunter, you need to understand where the best places and conditions are to find them. With diligence, the New England countryside, the Great Plains, southern farmlands and our broad coastal areas still offer a good chance of finding ancient artifacts.
First, while on the hunt for artifacts, one should keep in mind three basic rules of decency that should be followed. Number one, never hunt on Native American owned property. Number two, always get permission to hunt on private property. Number three, always keep an archeological attitude of respect when you suspect you've come across a site that may have historical significance. If you do stumble onto a site of this type, seek the assistance of an expert in this field of study and tread lightly. Live by these rules and you will avoid breaking the law or disturbing what may be an important and historically significant find. This will limit your hunting expeditions to certain areas and conditions, but don't be discouraged, for many of the Native American Indians were nomadic and endlessly traveled all over the land, dropping and losing artifacts everywhere they went.

Generally speaking, an experienced eye will have more success in finding artifacts. And that said, only time spent searching will give you an experienced eye. A vast majority of finds will include broken pieces of various items such as, clay pot shards, beads, antler or animal bone fragments, broken arrowheads and chips of knapped stone. For the beginner, these may go unnoticed and be unappreciated, but to the experienced searcher, these are signs of activity in the area and a cause for excitement.

To find an item that is fully intact is extremely rare. And, to find an arrowhead that is not only intact, but also artfully made is rarer still. Many times, an arrowhead or point will have some defect or be crudely made. Because, creating an arrowhead is difficult and time consuming work, they were not valued, by their makers, for beauty. They were valued for their efficiency and purpose. Prehistoric Americans were practical people and they made the best use of their time.

The original native hunters could not have imagined that time would bring relic hunters to find their lost projectile points. But, it's true, time would bring those who would search endlessly in corn fields and riverbanks just to find one slender point
Submitted by:
palani13
5 years ago
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+ 5 -
As a child We would hunt arrowheads in Rural Middle Tennessee. We had a lot of luck on fields that hadn't been plowed in many years.
Submitted by:
ALS
5 years ago
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+ 2 -
It is NOT illegal to own arrowheads. Whoever posted that is an ignorant fool! It is only illegal to collect them off federal or state property, and grave related sites. But it is not a federal offense to own an arrowhead. Just ask former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, who is a collector himself. He was also instrumental in passing the archaeological act of 1979, making it legal to surface hunt for arrowheads on private property.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
4 years ago
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+ 1 -
An elderly friend gave me a bucket of artifacts he had picked up in the Ohio Valley region. He asked farmers if he could look around in their fields.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
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+ 0 -
A good place to find arrowheads is in the farms of Ohio and along the Ohio River
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
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+ 0 -

Arizona, Texas,Oklahoma and Mexico are good places
Submitted by:
aleem
5 years ago
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+ 0 -
Many arrowheads have been found along the Susquehanna River
in Washington Boro, Pa.
Submitted by:
kagie1
5 years ago
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+ 0 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads.

Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
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+ 0 -
THE first people who used this was your PREHISTORIC NOMADS AND BYE HUNTERS AS WELL AS THE INDIANS ! I would first look up in old history on native American INDIANS because their were a lot of tribes in the UNITED STATES and it also helps to talk to some elders on INDIAN GROUNDS ! THEIR FOUND ON RIVER BEDS & IN old undeveloped lands & ruins
Submitted by:
Anonymous
4 years ago
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+ 0 -
It is not illegal to collect!

Submitted by:
Anonymous
3 years ago
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+ -1 -
Best place to find Native American arrowheads would be places where lots of Native Americans lived but on land that's not touched and undeveloped. The Southwest is a great place to look, like Arizona, New Mexico, etc.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
To find arrowheads and Native American artifacts, you must first locate a genuine site. A great site to find Native American arrowheads is:

http://www.caddotc.com/
Submitted by:
Rathi
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
Indian Creek, just north of Nobility, Texas, is a virtual hotbed for American Indian artifacts. If you start at Indian Creek Baptist Church, an interesting historical landmark in itself, and work the creek behind the church cemetary to the south, you have the possibility of finding numerous amounts of arrowheads, and other possible items. Don't worry about how heavily wooded it gets, it will open up for you as you travel through it. This area was once home to the Caddo Indians.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
in America Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads
Submitted by:
aleem
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads, however, you cannot take them from public lands
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -1 -
Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all good places for finding arrowheads, however, you cannot take them from public lands. You can ask for permission to search on private lands.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -2 -
One particularly good idea would be to search on the paths between historical forts in the Old West era. While the forts themselves may likely be public land, the former roads between them are often not so. Any conflicts on these roads could be a potential treasure haul.
Submitted by:
Mack
5 years ago
Rating
+ -12 -
A museum is the best place, you could get into big trouble if someone catches you with native artifacts, it is now a federal offense to collect these types of materials.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago
Rating
+ -14 -
A museum is the best place, you could get into big trouble if someone catches you with native artifacts, and it is now a federal offense to collect these types of materials.
Submitted by:
Anonymous
5 years ago

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native (5)   finding (6)   texas (14)   mexico (10)   american (29)   arizona (4)   public (10)   search (12)   property (8)   federal (5)  

 

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